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Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering Newsletter 2016

Leaders in Catalysis Research

James PetersenCatalysts For Change

In the past decade, WSU has become one of the nation’s top chemical engineering programs in catalysis with high-impact research in transformational energy technologies. Catalysts are critically important to more than 35 percent of the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and are a vital key to our economic, environmental, and public health.
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Breakthrough Catalysis Research

Novel method creates important chemicals simply, cheaply

Researchers determine key improvement for fuel cells

Improving catalyst efficiency for clean industries

Researchers shed light on important catalyst structure

Fostering Student Entrepreneurship

Emily Willard, left, and Katherine Brandenstein created the sterilized injection project, Engage.For two bioengineering students who did not think much of entrepreneurship a year ago, Emily Willard and Katherine Brandenstein have been making quite a splash in Washington’s biotech startup space. Their company—Engage—started as a senior design class assignment in the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering.
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Bolstering Graduate Education

Yunsheng Ma, chairman of Shandong Chambroad Holding Co. Ltd., left, and WSU’s Chris Keane and Asif Chaudhry sign the agreement in China.Washington State University has entered into an agreement with Shandong Chambroad Holding Co. Ltd., a private Chinese corporation, to educate WSU doctoral students to meet significant societal needs in energy and environment. The corporation will provide up to $5 million to support five new students each year, up to a total of 20 students simultaneously, in chemical engineering, chemistry, or materials science and engineering.
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Antibiotic Alternative To Treat Infections

Bacterial levels before treatment with electric currentWashington State University researchers for the first time have discovered how electrical stimulation works for the treatment of bacterial infections, paving the way for a viable alternative to medicinal antibiotics. The researchers passed an electric current over a film of bacteria and in 24 hours killed almost all of a multi-drug resistant bacterium that is often present in difficult-to-treat infections.
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WSU Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering 2016 newsletter cover

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