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Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

MME Seminar Series Welcomes Dr. Erin Barker, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

In ETRL 101

Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Process to Structure to Property Modeling of Dissimilar Material Joining

Abstract

The automotive industry has been taking specific steps to reduce vehicle to improve fuel economy.  Materials such as aluminum and magnesium alloys have been investigated as alternatives to heavy steel components.           Advanced high strength steels have also been developed to target a regime of higher strength but lower weight.  Introducing a variety of materials for the structural and non-structural components of the vehicle requires designers and engineering to consider how to join the materials. This variety of        materials often have very different metaling point ruling out traditional joining techniques.  This talk will describe the friction stir scribe joining technique and how modeling is being used to understanding the underlying physics occurring during the process.  The techniques being used to model the   process to structure and structure to properties linkages will also be         discussed.

Biography

Erin Iesulauro Barker received her Ph.D in Civil Engineering from Cornell University in 2006.  At Cornell, she was a member of the Cornell Fracture Group where she focused on computational solid mechanics and fracture mechanics as well as software development.  She began her career at Los Alamos National Lab as a post-doc and then staff scientist working on multi-physics and multi-scale simulation capabilities.  In 2010, she joined PNNL in the Computational Engineering Group.  Her work has focused on developing models for material behavior and failure at the microstructure scale.  She is also heavily involved in developing software tools and frameworks for material modeling from synthetic sample generation to high performance computing simulation capabilities.  Erin is currently the Acting Group Lead for the Computational Engineering Group.

 

Meet Mary

Mary Rezac is the new dean of Washington State University's Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture.

Mary Rezac is Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture’s new dean. She comes to Pullman from Kansas State University, where she served as Tim Taylor Professor of Chemical Engineering and director of Major Grant Initiatives in the College of Engineering.

Here’s a chance to get to know Mary and her thoughts on the future of Voiland College. » More …

Giving Opportunity

Ramiro Gonzalez

Strategically looking for answers, Ramiro Gonzalez gazes across his table that lies covered in papers, a ruler, textbooks, different colored pens, and a cup of tea. It’s a daily routine, as he waits for someone to help. » More …

Lab Safety Training

The Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture (VCEA), in partnership with WSU Environmental Health & Safety, created a specifically designed safety course to address the most common safety practices and areas of risk lab users may experience at WSU.

The course has been taken by numerous seasoned scientists, as well as those with no lab experience.  Both groups have noted they come away from the course pleasantly surprised at what they learned, and most make changes in their lab practices as a result.

VCEA strongly encourages all Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture personnel working or supporting a lab environment take this training, indifferent of their experience.

The training, already a requirement for any PACCAR lab user, provides an updated look at current lab practices in addition to three primary areas that influence risk within a lab.

  • Five Focus Areas and Chemical Compatibility
  • General Laboratory Safety and Hazard Communication
  • Dangerous Waste Generator, Chemical Storage, Emergency Response and Planning

The safety course is free of charge.

Silver Cloud

Using foglike microdroplets of silver, WSU researchers create intricate structures that mimic natural materials. Pictured: nanoparticles forming the letters W S U.

Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, 3-D manufacturing method that for the first time rapidly creates and precisely controls a material’s architecture from the nanoscale to centimeters – with results that closely mimic the intricate architecture of natural materials like wood and bone.

They report on their work in the journal Science Advances (http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/3/e1601986) and have filed for a patent. » More …

Keeping Up With Kory

Kory O’Connor in WSU's Formula SAE race car

Mechanical engineering major Kory O’Connor is a man in motion.

Kory, how did you choose mechanical engineering as your major?

Since I was a kid, I loved taking things apart and figuring out how they worked. If there is something that is broken, I like to try and figure out how to fix it. I like to work with my hands and I liked things that moved and were powered with something – cars, robots, or anything that has motion – and mechanical engineering is the perfect match for that. » More …

Lab Safety Training

The Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture (VCEA), in partnership with WSU Environmental Health & Safety, created a specifically designed safety course to address the most common safety practices and areas of risk lab users may experience at WSU.

The course has been taken by numerous seasoned scientists, as well as those with no lab experience.  Both groups have noted they come away from the course pleasantly surprised at what they learned, and most make changes in their lab practices as a result.

VCEA strongly encourages all Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture personnel working or supporting a lab environment take this training, indifferent of their experience.

The training, already a requirement for any PACCAR lab user, provides an updated look at current lab practices in addition to three primary areas that influence risk within a lab.

  • Five Focus Areas and Chemical Compatibility
  • General Laboratory Safety and Hazard Communication
  • Dangerous Waste Generator, Chemical Storage, Emergency Response and Planning

The safety course is free of charge.

Lab Safety Training

The Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture (VCEA), in partnership with WSU Environmental Health & Safety, created a specifically designed safety course to address the most common safety practices and areas of risk lab users may experience at WSU.

The course has been taken by numerous seasoned scientists, as well as those with no lab experience.  Both groups have noted they come away from the course pleasantly surprised at what they learned, and most make changes in their lab practices as a result.

VCEA strongly encourages all Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture personnel working or supporting a lab environment take this training, indifferent of their experience.

The training, already a requirement for any PACCAR lab user, provides an updated look at current lab practices in addition to three primary areas that influence risk within a lab.

  • Five Focus Areas and Chemical Compatibility
  • General Laboratory Safety and Hazard Communication
  • Dangerous Waste Generator, Chemical Storage, Emergency Response and Planning

The safety course is free of charge.

Lab Safety Training

The Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture (VCEA), in partnership with WSU Environmental Health & Safety, created a specifically designed safety course to address the most common safety practices and areas of risk lab users may experience at WSU.

The course has been taken by numerous seasoned scientists, as well as those with no lab experience.  Both groups have noted they come away from the course pleasantly surprised at what they learned, and most make changes in their lab practices as a result.

VCEA strongly encourages all Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture personnel working or supporting a lab environment take this training, indifferent of their experience.

The training, already a requirement for any PACCAR lab user, provides an updated look at current lab practices in addition to three primary areas that influence risk within a lab.

  • Five Focus Areas and Chemical Compatibility
  • General Laboratory Safety and Hazard Communication
  • Dangerous Waste Generator, Chemical Storage, Emergency Response and Planning

The safety course is free of charge.

Lab Safety Training

The Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture (VCEA), in partnership with WSU Environmental Health & Safety, created a specifically designed safety course to address the most common safety practices and areas of risk lab users may experience at WSU.

The course has been taken by numerous seasoned scientists, as well as those with no lab experience.  Both groups have noted they come away from the course pleasantly surprised at what they learned, and most make changes in their lab practices as a result.

VCEA strongly encourages all Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture personnel working or supporting a lab environment take this training, indifferent of their experience.

The training, already a requirement for any PACCAR lab user, provides an updated look at current lab practices in addition to three primary areas that influence risk within a lab.

 

  • Five Focus Areas and Chemical Compatibility
  • General Laboratory Safety and Hazard Communication
  • Dangerous Waste Generator, Chemical Storage, Emergency Response and Planning

 

The safety course is free of charge.