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Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering

MME Seminar Series Welcomes Dr. Praveen Thallapally, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Thursday in ETRL 101

Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Dr. Praveen K. Thallapally

 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA

Ph.D in Chemistry and M.S. in Physical-Organic Chemistry, Ph.D. in Chemistry

 Advanced Nanostructured Materials for Selective Separation and Extraction

 

Abstract

In the materials science realm, porous materials, such as polymers, covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and metal organic frameworks (MOFs), are extremely valuable because of their stability and pore size. It is also easy to manipulate their chemistry. Typically, MOFs and COFs have the surface area of a football field, which enables them to capture and store large amounts of gas molecules and use as sensors. Similarly surface functionalization of MOF thin films on magnetic core particles were demonstrated for catalysis and separation applications. During my presentation I will touch up on two different applications (extraction of rare earth elements from geothermal brine solution and separation of noble gases from nuclear reprocessing plants) of MOFs that PNNL is working on.

 

Biography

My research is focused on the development of novel materials for energy applications, including catalysis, energy storage, carbon capture, and nuclear reprocessing. In the past 10 years I conducted both fundamental and applied research on a large number of novel crystalline organic and metal-organic frameworks (MOF) and membrane materials. The results of my research on synthesis, characterization and separation using porous organic and metal organic frameworks were published in more than 50 DOE technical reports and ~130 manuscripts in international peer-reviewed journals, as well as 6 reviews and 5 book chapters, The scientific impact of my research is evidenced by over 6800 citations and H-index of 47 (Google Scholar) attracted by these publications.

In addition to peer-review journals, the results of my work are disseminated through other professional publications. For example, research on MOFs membrane for CO2 separation was featured in 2013 Presidents Budget report; several other publications were featured on external websites, including Department of Energy – Office of Science website. I also contributed to a report to the Department of Energy on the first economic assessment of solid sorbents for CO2 capture from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants and first economic analysis report comparing room temperature separation of Xe and Kr from air to cryogenic separation process.

I supervise research by graduate and undergraduate students and mentor junior researchers. I am engaged with broad scientific community as a Topic Editor for Crystal Growth & Design, Advisory Board member for CrystEngComm and Journal of Coordination Chemistry, Guest Editor for Catalysis Today and community Board of Editor for Cryst. Grow & Des. Network. I also (co-)organize professional meetings at the national and international levels, including “Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Conversions and Utilization” (Denver, 2011), “CO2 Capture, Conversion and Utilization” (San Diego, 2012), “Metal Organic Frameworks for Energy and Fuels” (ACS, Philadelphia, 2012), and “Metal Organic Frameworks for Catalysis Applications” (ACS, Boston, 2015), as well as by facilitating scientific exchange as a discussion leader.

Finally, I work with sponsors and industrial partners in defining promising research directions going forward by participating in workshops related to NanoNuclear organized by Department of Energy – Office of Nuclear Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory (2013) and serving as a reviewer for DOE, NSF and American petroleum research fund.

 

 

 

MME Seminar Series Welcomes Dr. Yogendra Joshi, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Yogendra Joshi

G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
Held in ETRL 101
Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am
Thermal Management and Design Approaches to
Enable Heterogeneous 3D Integration
Abstract

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon.  Heterogeneous integration promises to bring in multiple functionalities in highly compact form factors via interposer based (2.5D) and three-dimensional (3D) stacked chip approaches.  Compared to planar integrated circuits (ICs), 3D stacked ICs as an emerging technology have significant advantages, including shorter interconnection length, smaller power consumption, and higher computation speed. However, chip stacking poses great challenges to thermal management.  Increased chip temperatures can degrade the reliability and performance, and increase the leakage power that constitutes a significant part of the total chip power. To mitigate these undesirable effects, advanced thermal management, such as microfluidic cooling can be employed. Very few experimental demonstrations of CMOS chips with integrated microfluidic cooling currently exist. In this presentation, inter-tier microfluidic cooling will be explored as a promising approach for future 3D stacked ICs due to its superior thermal performance and scalability. I will discuss ongoing research on microfluidic single phase and two phase cooling to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.  Examples of thermal/electrical co-design, which is essential for successful use of this technology will be presented for high performance and mobile applications. For the latter, thermal management and energy conservation must be simultaneously considered.  To fully utilize microfluidic cooling, reliable fluid delivery systems and good heat transfer fluids are required. It is concluded that extensive research on integration of inter-tier microfluidic cooling of 3D stacked ICs is still needed.

Biography

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon.  Heterogeneous integration promises to bring in multiple functionalities in highly compact form factors via interposer based (2.5D) and three-dimensional (3D) stacked chip approaches.  Compared to planar integrated circuits (ICs), 3D stacked ICs as an emerging technology have significant advantages, including shorter interconnection length, smaller power consumption, and higher computation speed. However, chip stacking poses great challenges to thermal management.  Increased chip temperatures can degrade the reliability and performance, and increase the leakage power that constitutes a significant part of the total chip power. To mitigate these undesirable effects, advanced thermal management, such as microfluidic cooling can be employed. Very few experimental demonstrations of CMOS chips with integrated microfluidic cooling currently exist. In this presentation, inter-tier microfluidic cooling will be explored as a promising approach for future 3D stacked ICs due to its superior thermal performance and scalability. I will discuss ongoing research on microfluidic single phase and two phase cooling to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.  Examples of thermal/electrical co-design, which is essential for successful use of this technology will be presented for high performance and mobile applications. For the latter, thermal management and energy conservation must be simultaneously considered.  To fully utilize microfluidic cooling, reliable fluid delivery systems and good heat transfer fluids are required. It is concluded that extensive research on integration of inter-tier microfluidic cooling of 3D stacked ICs is still needed.

Westrock Information Session and Interviews

Westrock is recruiting for Summer, 2018 internships in maintenance, operations and process control engineering departments. For mechanical, electrical and chemical engineering students from the sophomore class and above, an information session will be an opportunity to learn more about the company. Interviews will be held the following day for select candidates.

To apply, email a copy of your resume and cover letter to Jim Barnett jbarnett@westrock.com by Monday, January 22nd 2018. Reference Summer 2018 internship and your major in the subject line, or bring your cover letter and resume to the information session.

Amway Nutrilite Vitamins

Amway Nutrilite Vitamins will be recruiting on campus Tuesday, November 7, 5-6 p.m., Wegner G70C, and conducting interviews November 8.  Check them out for ChemE job and internship opportunities in Washington.

 

About the company:

Amway is an American company specializing in the use of multi-level marketing to sell health, beauty, and home care products.

MME SEMINAR SERIES is excited to present two guest speakers this Thursday: Dr. Larry Ilcewicz, Federal Aviation Administration & Dr. Paul McConnaughey, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 to 11:00 am

Dr. Larry Ilcewicz

Federal Aviation Administration, Chief Scientific and Technical Advisor for Composite Materials

Scaling Crucial to Integrated Product Development of Composite Airframe Structure

Special Time – 9:30 to 10:30  in ETRL 101

Abstract

Applications of advanced composite materials in aircraft products have spanned several decades.  These products include small airplanes, propellers,  rotorcraft, military jets, and transport aircraft.  Historical perspectives on  composites used in airframe structure will be summarized, including thoughts on product development, certification, production, and service difficulties.  This will include a review of critical design, manufacturing, maintenance, and cost issues for composite aircraft structures.  It will also summarize the service history, including thoughts relating to the American Airlines Flight Number 587 Accident in 2001.  An  introduction to the damage tolerance of composite aircraft structure will be  given some emphasis.  The technical challenges and barriers to expanding, new   applications will also be discussed as related to career opportunities and integrated product teams in the industry.

Biography

Dr. Larry Ilcewicz is the FAA Chief Scientific and Technical Advisor for Composite Materials.  He started work with the FAA in 1998 and has supported many small airplane, rotorcraft and transport aircraft certification programs.  He has also worked on accident investigations and service problems involving composites.  These experiences helped Larry develop an international plan for composite safety and certification initiatives to work with industry, academia and other government groups in pursuit of guidance, training and standardization.  These efforts formed the basis for a FAA Aviation Safety Composite Plan, which outlines efforts until 2021.

Larry came to the FAA from Boeing, where he worked 17 years on various programs in the commercial transport aircraft division.  This included support to 737, 757, 767 and 777 aircraft in various stages of development, production and service.  Larry was also principal investigator for a large NASA-funded research program to develop  composite design and manufacturing concepts for a wide-body transport fuselage in the 1990s.  He has authored/co-authored more than 80 technical publications.  He has been co-chairman for Composite Materials Handbook 17, CMH-17, since joining the FAA.  In 2013, he was the only member of the United States Department of Transportation to win the Presidential Rank Award.

BEING FOLLOWED BY:
Dr. Paul McConnaughey
Associate Director, Technical, In the Office of the Center Director at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama

The Future of Deep Space Human Exploration
11:00 – 12:00 noon in ETRL 101

Abstract

Why explore deep space? And what technologies will it take to get there? Dr. Paul McConnaughey, associate director, technical, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center will discuss the importance of engineering advanced technologies to  journey to deep space – to cislunar, the Moon, Mars and beyond. From the  evolvable heavy-lift capability of the Space Launch System to cutting edge lander propulsion technology, the journey to deep space will require innovation and the next generation STEM workforce to be successful.

Biography

Dr. Paul K. McConnaughey is the associate director, technical, in the Office of the Center Director at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Named to the position in August 2015, McConnaughey is responsible for ensuring the performance of Marshall’s programs and technical activities, with respect to cost, schedule and mission success.

Originally from the Midwest, he earned his bachelor’s degree from Oregon State University in Corvallis, and his master’s degree and doctorate from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He joined Marshall in 1986 as an engineer in the Systems Dynamics Laboratory. McConnaughey has held various leadership positions of  increasing responsibility, including being selected as Marshall’s chief engineer in 2007 and serving as the director of System Engineering and Integration and the chief engineer of the Exploration Systems Development Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

McConnaughey has three daughters and resides in Huntsville, with his wife Angie and their two dogs.

Meet Mary

Dean Rezac standing in her office.
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Here’s a chance to get to know Mary and her thoughts on the future of Voiland College. » More ...

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Taking a Risk

Steven works with a student in the lab.
In 2006, Steven Saunders took a risk on research. Today, he’s reaping the reward.

It’s been a year of change for Steven Saunders.

In February, Saunders , an assistant professor in the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, received a prestigious Career award from the National Science Foundation for his groundbreaking research.

In April, he received Voiland College’s Reid Miller Excellence in Teaching Award. » More ...