“GHC made me feel empowered. The experience made me realize my worth to an employer and gave me a sense of belonging in the tech world.”

WSU students recently attended the Grace Hopper Conference (GHC) where they learned about research and career opportunities in computing. The Grace Hopper Conference is the world’s largest gathering of women technologists. Students are able to participate in a variety of professional development activities, attend presentations on a variety of topics, and meet industry leaders.

Two women pose on a bicycle by a display that says See Yourself at Google.
Helen Catanese (left) and Neda Zarayeneh (right) had the opportunity to get familiar with companies such as Google at the Grace Hopper Convention.

Why attend GHC?

“I think it’s a really energizing experience to immerse yourself in a world where women in technical roles is the norm. It’s also an excellent opportunity to meet smart and interesting people working in your field. Those connections help make you feel like you belong.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Helen Catanese, 2019 GHC attendee

“The conference was a huge gathering of 26,000 amazing individuals that I could relate to. Every person I spoke to had a unique background in tech and a distinct passion for what they do.”
—WSU Everett undergraduate student Rebecca Rothschild, 2019 GHC attendee

Why is GHC important?

“This conference sheds light on the inequalities present in the computing industry. It provides a setting for women to share their common experiences, be exposed to opportunities, and expand their technical knowledge.”
—WSU Everett undergraduate student Rebecca Rothschild, 2019 GHC attendee

“It will boost your confidence, help make your future, do networking, get familiar with many companies and help you realize what you want.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Neda Zarayeneh, 2019 GHC

What did you learn at GHC?

“I learned that I am not alone in my position, and that companies care about women in technology. I also learned that the opportunities available to me are endless.”
—WSU Everett undergraduate student Rebecca Rothschild, 2019 GHC attendee

“The importance of being able to show not only projects, but large projects you’ve worked on that involve collaborating with more than a couple people, when looking for internships/jobs in software engineering.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Helen Catanese, 2019 GHC attendee

Why do you love your major?

“I love the endless opportunities and technologies available to me as a software engineer. I am always looking to learn more and expand my skillset and there is no shortage of things to learn and experiment with.”
—WSU Everett undergraduate student Rebecca Rothschild, Software Engineering major, 2019 GHC attendee

“It’s practical and I can solve real-world challenges.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Neda Zarayeneh, Computer Science major, 2019 GHC

“CS is a one of the few academic disciplines focused around making things. There’s nothing more satisfying that seeing a problem, building a solution and watching it work.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Helen Catanese, Computer Science major, 2019 GHC attendee

What are your future plans?

“I’d like to advance into a product or project management role doing humanitarian work.”
—WSU Everett undergraduate student Rebecca Rothschild, 2019 GHC attendee

“A data scientist.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Neda Zarayeneh, 2019 GHC

“I may end up in software engineering or doing data science for a business or lab — I’m definitely looking at my options.”
—WSU Pullman graduate student Helen Catanese, 2019 GHC attendee