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Boeing Career Development Lecture Series

Boeing’s Justin Obrien will visit the WSU campus as a speaker. The topic will be The Future …Today.

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Week of Women in STEM, April 2-5, 2018

The Week of Women in STEM is designed to provide inspiration and professional development by bringing professionals and students together for networking and mentoring. A special showing on April 2, 8-10 p.m., of the acclaimed movie, “Hidden Figures” will kick off the week, followed by a keynote speech by Gerri Martin-Flickinger, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Starbucks April 3, and a unique STEM panel discussion and dinner on April 4. The week’s events will include in a formal dinner with a scientist/engineer for students and industry alumni. On Thursday, April 5th, the American Association of University Women will present two salary negotiation workshops. » More ...

Boeing Career Development Lecture Series

Boeing’s Christin Datz will visit the WSU campus as a speaker. The topic will be Eco Demonstration.

This event is open to all students.

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Meeting number: 894 544 269
Meeting password: WSUboeing1234

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MME Seminar Series Welcomes Dr. Yogendra Joshi, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Yogendra Joshi

G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Held in ETRL 101
Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Thermal Management and Design Approaches to

Enable Heterogeneous 3D Integration

Abstract

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon.  Heterogeneous integration promises to bring in multiple functionalities in highly compact form factors via interposer based (2.5D) and three-dimensional (3D) stacked chip approaches.  Compared to planar integrated circuits (ICs), 3D stacked ICs as an emerging technology have significant advantages, including shorter interconnection length, smaller power consumption, and higher computation speed. However, chip stacking poses great challenges to thermal management.  Increased chip temperatures can degrade the reliability and performance, and increase the leakage power that constitutes a significant part of the total chip power. To mitigate these undesirable effects, advanced thermal management, such as microfluidic cooling can be employed. Very few experimental demonstrations of CMOS chips with integrated microfluidic cooling currently exist. In this presentation, inter-tier microfluidic cooling will be explored as a promising approach for future 3D stacked ICs due to its superior thermal performance and scalability. I will discuss ongoing research on microfluidic single phase and two phase cooling to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.  Examples of thermal/electrical co-design, which is essential for successful use of this technology will be presented for high performance and mobile applications. For the latter, thermal management and energy conservation must be simultaneously considered.  To fully utilize microfluidic cooling, reliable fluid delivery systems and good heat transfer fluids are required. It is concluded that extensive research on integration of inter-tier microfluidic cooling of 3D stacked ICs is still needed.

 

Biography

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon.  Heterogeneous integration promises to bring in multiple functionalities in highly compact form factors via interposer based (2.5D) and three-dimensional (3D) stacked chip approaches.  Compared to planar integrated circuits (ICs), 3D stacked ICs as an emerging technology have significant advantages, including shorter interconnection length, smaller power consumption, and higher computation speed. However, chip stacking poses great challenges to thermal management.  Increased chip temperatures can degrade the reliability and performance, and increase the leakage power that constitutes a significant part of the total chip power. To mitigate these undesirable effects, advanced thermal management, such as microfluidic cooling can be employed. Very few experimental demonstrations of CMOS chips with integrated microfluidic cooling currently exist. In this presentation, inter-tier microfluidic cooling will be explored as a promising approach for future 3D stacked ICs due to its superior thermal performance and scalability. I will discuss ongoing research on microfluidic single phase and two phase cooling to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.  Examples of thermal/electrical co-design, which is essential for successful use of this technology will be presented for high performance and mobile applications. For the latter, thermal management and energy conservation must be simultaneously considered.  To fully utilize microfluidic cooling, reliable fluid delivery systems and good heat transfer fluids are required. It is concluded that extensive research on integration of inter-tier microfluidic cooling of 3D stacked ICs is still needed.

 

 

 

 

MME Seminar Series Welcomes: Dr. Tao Xing, University of Idaho

Held  in ETRL 101

Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Dr. Tao Xing, Ph.D., P.E.

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering

University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho

Solution Verification for Large Eddy Simulations
In Computational Fluid Dynamics

Abstract

With the dramatic growth of supercomputers, simulation based design, and ultimately virtual reality, have become increasingly important for the advancement of science and engineering.  Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides   computerized solutions for science and engineering problems using modeling, numerical methods, and high-performance computing. In CFD, the continuous partial differential equations are discretized into algebraic equations using numerical methods.  The algebraic equations are assembled and solved to get approximate solutions.  Thus, it is imperative to quantitatively estimate the numerical and modeling errors and associated uncertainties, which can only be achieved through rigorous verification and validation (V&V).  Additionally, guidelines for how to optimize a CFD simulation to obtain a minimum total simulation error are needed.  In this speech, definitions, general methodology and procedures of V&V will be covered. Based on statistical analysis, the “Factor of Safety” method shows advantages over various versions of the grid convergence index method, correction factor method, and least square method for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) V&V.  Nonetheless, these methods cannot be applied directly to large eddy simulations (LES) V&V.  Recently, a general framework for LES V&V was developed including a vast number methods based on two Hypotheses, ranging from a sophisticated seven-equation method to a simple single grid method. These methods were evaluated using implicitly filtered LES of periodic channel flows at friction Reynolds number of 395 on eight systematically refined grids. The seven-equation method shows that the coupling error based on Hypothesis I is much smaller as compared to the numerical and modeling errors and therefore can be neglected. The five-equation method based on Hypothesis II is recommended, which shows a monotonic convergence behavior of the predicted numerical benchmark (SC), and provides realistic error estimates without the need of fixing the orders of accuracy for either numerical or modeling errors. Based on the results from seven-equation and five-equation methods, less expensive three and four-equation methods for practical LES applications were derived. It was found that the new three-equation method is robust as it can be applied to any convergence types and reasonably predicts the error trends. It was also observed that the numerical and modeling errors usually have opposite signs in LES, which suggests error cancellation play an essential role in LES. When RANS verification method is applied, it shows significant error in the prediction of SC on coarse meshes. However, it predicts reasonable SC when the grids resolve at least 80% of the total turbulent kinetic energy.

Biography

Dr. Tao Xing earned his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University in 2002. He worked as a Postdoctoral    Fellow and Assistant Research Scientist at the Iowa Institute of Hydraulics Research from 2002 to 2008. He was an Assistant Professor from 2009 to 2016. Dr. Xing is currently an Associate Professor at University of Idaho. His research interests focus on both fundamental and applied CFD in multi-disciplines. Fundamental CFD research includes estimation of errors and uncertainties using quantitate solution verification and validation (V&V) method for turbulent flow simulations and entropy generation for bypass transitional boundary layers. For V&V, the “factor of safety method” he developed was evaluated as the most accurate and concise uncertainty estimates for monotonically converged numerical solutions.  He was invited to give 12 lectures including the keynote lecture on verification and validation in the 13th National Congress on Hydrodynamics in China in 2014. In 2015, he developed a general framework for V&V for large eddy simulations and very recently        five-equation and robust three-equation methods for LES V&V. Applied CFD research covers a broad range of disciplines including onshore and offshore wind turbine designs, vehicle aerodynamics, fluid-structure interaction for pulmonary ventilation, ship hydrodynamics, and desalination. Dr. Xing’s teaching interests focus on integration of simulation technology into engineering courses and laboratories, development of effective formative and summative evaluation   methods, and development of innovative teaching modules toward achieving ABET learning outcomes. His Google Scholar h-index and i10-index are 19 and 29, respectively. As a PI or Co-PI, he secured more than 1.8 million dollars funding since he joined the University of Idaho in 2011. He won the “Alumni Award” from the University of Idaho in 2013 and again in 2014. He won the “Outstanding Young Faculty Award” from College of Engineering in 2015. He is a licensed U.S. Professional  Engineer.

 

 

 

Seminar Series Presents Dr. Stephen D. Antolovich, WSU Emeritus Professor

Held in ETRL 101
Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Fracture Mechanics- An Interpretive Technical History

Abstract

In this presentation, the historical and analytical context of the development of what is now known as ‘Fracture Mechanics’ are selectively developed. The starting point is from safety and economic considerations. The essential efforts, over many centuries, to be able to predict the progression of damage and final fracture are reviewed and discussed. The essential contributions of some of the key figures such as Hammurabi (Mesopotamia), Charpy (France), Wohler (Germany), Inglis (England), Griffith (England), Irwin (USA), Paris (USA) are pointed out. The inter-dependent nature of these contributions is pointed out. The essential and brilliant integrating efforts of Dr. George Irwin to define the field we now know as Fracture Mechanics are emphasized. Some thoughts on unmet needs and new directions conclude the presentation.

Biography

Dr. Antolovich received his BS and MS from the University of Wisconsin (Madison) and his Ph.D. from the University of California (Berkeley). He is currently Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University (WSU) and at Georgia Tech. He was the Founding Director of the School of Materials Engineering at Georgia Tech and served as Director, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, at Washington State University. He held the   Lindholm Chair of Materials Science at WSU and held Professorial appointments at Ecole des Mines, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Université de Technologie de Compiegne, and Université de Paris in France for teaching, research and student advisement over more than   thirty-five years.

His major research interests are in fracture mechanics, the physics of deformation and fatigue mechanisms, and fatigue high temperatures. He has made numerous presentations to learned  societies, universities, national laboratories and industrial organizations in the U.S., Europe,       Canada, Korea, and Japan and published widely in international journals and conferences. He    carried out funded research and consultation for numerous national and international government agencies and companies. He has been the recipient of international research awards and is a     Fellow Member of ASME, ASM, and recognized as ‘Academician of ICF’.

Received teaching awards at the University of Cincinnati and WSU and was named Outstanding Faculty Member by the Georgia Tech Graduate Student Senate.

 

 

Boeing Career Development Lecture Series

Boeing’s David A. Okrent will be visiting the WSU campus as a speaker. His topic will be Aerospace Marketing.

Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 894 544 269
Meeting password: WSUboeing1234

Join from a video conferencing system or application
Dial 894544269@boeing.webex.com

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+1-425-943-7320 U.S. NW
1-888-787-5387 U.S Toll Free-high cost
Access code: 894 544 269
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