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Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

Northern Star

WSU Civil Engineering student Alyssa Norris at Convocation, Spring 2017

When someone tells you that they’re a president, a senator, and have worked in the White House, you’re bound to be impressed.

But when they say that Santa Claus was once their neighbor, you might start getting a little suspicious.

Washington State University’s Alyssa Norris can truthfully claim all these things- and more.

We recently caught up with the civil engineering major and asked her how she found her way from Alaska, to Pullman, Washington and what advice she has for students trying to discover their path to success. » More …

Summers’ Internship

Ryan Summers in the lab with Robosub

WSU’s Ryan Summers spent last summer building autonomous submarines and interning at SpaceX, a company that’s planning to send a space ship to Mars.

We recently spoke with the computer engineering major and Goldwater Scholar about his experience working at the aerospace company, and how WSU is preparing him for the future. » More …

Code Talker

Rachel Forbes

 
For Rachel Forbes, computer science is about community.

We recently caught up with Rachel to find out why she chose to study at WSU, and how she is sharing that experience in her role as student ambassador. » More …

#CougsGive

WSU Engineers Without Borders club group photo

Washington State University’s Engineers Without Borders is partnering with the rural village of Zapote, Panama to bring clean water to its 1,000 Ngäbe residents. Currently, the village’s residents do not have access to a reliable water source four months out of the year.

Make a gift to WSU’s Engineers Without Borders and help us show that Cougs Care, Cougs Lead, #CougsGive.

Lab Safety Training

The Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture (VCEA), in partnership with WSU Environmental Health & Safety, created a specifically designed safety course to address the most common safety practices and areas of risk lab users may experience at WSU.

The course has been taken by numerous seasoned scientists, as well as those with no lab experience.  Both groups have noted they come away from the course pleasantly surprised at what they learned, and most make changes in their lab practices as a result.

VCEA strongly encourages all Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture personnel working or supporting a lab environment take this training, indifferent of their experience.

The training, already a requirement for any PACCAR lab user, provides an updated look at current lab practices in addition to three primary areas that influence risk within a lab.

  • Five Focus Areas and Chemical Compatibility
  • General Laboratory Safety and Hazard Communication
  • Dangerous Waste Generator, Chemical Storage, Emergency Response and Planning

The safety course is free of charge.

Silver Cloud

Using foglike microdroplets of silver, WSU researchers create intricate structures that mimic natural materials. Pictured: nanoparticles forming the letters W S U.

Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, 3-D manufacturing method that for the first time rapidly creates and precisely controls a material’s architecture from the nanoscale to centimeters – with results that closely mimic the intricate architecture of natural materials like wood and bone.
» More …

Community health analytics initiative gets underway

WSU researchers use analytics to improve understanding of microbial resistance.

For most of the twentieth century, people didn’t worry about an illness like strep throat or an infected cut because they could go to the doctor for a quick dose of antibiotics, which was invariably followed by a quick recovery. » More …

Keeping Up With Kory

Kory O’Connor in WSU's Formula SAE race car

Mechanical engineering major Kory O’Connor is a man in motion.

Kory, how did you choose mechanical engineering as your major?

Since I was a kid, I loved taking things apart and figuring out how they worked. If there is something that is broken, I like to try and figure out how to fix it. I like to work with my hands and I liked things that moved and were powered with something – cars, robots, or anything that has motion – and mechanical engineering is the perfect match for that. » More …