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Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture Washington State University

Week of Women in STEM, April 2-5, 2018

The Week of Women in STEM is designed to provide inspiration and professional development by bringing professionals and students together for networking and mentoring. A special showing on April 2, 8-10 p.m., of the acclaimed movie, “Hidden Figures” will kick off the week, followed by a keynote speech by Gerri Martin-Flickinger, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Starbucks April 3, and a unique STEM panel discussion and dinner on April 4. The week’s events will include in a formal dinner with a scientist/engineer for students and industry alumni. On Thursday, April 5th, the American Association of University Women will present two salary negotiation workshops. » More ...

MME Seminar Series Welcomes Dr. Yogendra Joshi, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Yogendra Joshi

G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Held in ETRL 101
Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Thermal Management and Design Approaches to

Enable Heterogeneous 3D Integration

Abstract

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon.  Heterogeneous integration promises to bring in multiple functionalities in highly compact form factors via interposer based (2.5D) and three-dimensional (3D) stacked chip approaches.  Compared to planar integrated circuits (ICs), 3D stacked ICs as an emerging technology have significant advantages, including shorter interconnection length, smaller power consumption, and higher computation speed. However, chip stacking poses great challenges to thermal management.  Increased chip temperatures can degrade the reliability and performance, and increase the leakage power that constitutes a significant part of the total chip power. To mitigate these undesirable effects, advanced thermal management, such as microfluidic cooling can be employed. Very few experimental demonstrations of CMOS chips with integrated microfluidic cooling currently exist. In this presentation, inter-tier microfluidic cooling will be explored as a promising approach for future 3D stacked ICs due to its superior thermal performance and scalability. I will discuss ongoing research on microfluidic single phase and two phase cooling to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.  Examples of thermal/electrical co-design, which is essential for successful use of this technology will be presented for high performance and mobile applications. For the latter, thermal management and energy conservation must be simultaneously considered.  To fully utilize microfluidic cooling, reliable fluid delivery systems and good heat transfer fluids are required. It is concluded that extensive research on integration of inter-tier microfluidic cooling of 3D stacked ICs is still needed.

 

Biography

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon.  Heterogeneous integration promises to bring in multiple functionalities in highly compact form factors via interposer based (2.5D) and three-dimensional (3D) stacked chip approaches.  Compared to planar integrated circuits (ICs), 3D stacked ICs as an emerging technology have significant advantages, including shorter interconnection length, smaller power consumption, and higher computation speed. However, chip stacking poses great challenges to thermal management.  Increased chip temperatures can degrade the reliability and performance, and increase the leakage power that constitutes a significant part of the total chip power. To mitigate these undesirable effects, advanced thermal management, such as microfluidic cooling can be employed. Very few experimental demonstrations of CMOS chips with integrated microfluidic cooling currently exist. In this presentation, inter-tier microfluidic cooling will be explored as a promising approach for future 3D stacked ICs due to its superior thermal performance and scalability. I will discuss ongoing research on microfluidic single phase and two phase cooling to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.  Examples of thermal/electrical co-design, which is essential for successful use of this technology will be presented for high performance and mobile applications. For the latter, thermal management and energy conservation must be simultaneously considered.  To fully utilize microfluidic cooling, reliable fluid delivery systems and good heat transfer fluids are required. It is concluded that extensive research on integration of inter-tier microfluidic cooling of 3D stacked ICs is still needed.

 

 

 

 

MME Seminar Series Welcomes: Dr. Tao Xing, University of Idaho

Held  in ETRL 101

Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Dr. Tao Xing, Ph.D., P.E.

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering

University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho

Solution Verification for Large Eddy Simulations
In Computational Fluid Dynamics

Abstract

With the dramatic growth of supercomputers, simulation based design, and ultimately virtual reality, have become increasingly important for the advancement of science and engineering.  Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides   computerized solutions for science and engineering problems using modeling, numerical methods, and high-performance computing. In CFD, the continuous partial differential equations are discretized into algebraic equations using numerical methods.  The algebraic equations are assembled and solved to get approximate solutions.  Thus, it is imperative to quantitatively estimate the numerical and modeling errors and associated uncertainties, which can only be achieved through rigorous verification and validation (V&V).  Additionally, guidelines for how to optimize a CFD simulation to obtain a minimum total simulation error are needed.  In this speech, definitions, general methodology and procedures of V&V will be covered. Based on statistical analysis, the “Factor of Safety” method shows advantages over various versions of the grid convergence index method, correction factor method, and least square method for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) V&V.  Nonetheless, these methods cannot be applied directly to large eddy simulations (LES) V&V.  Recently, a general framework for LES V&V was developed including a vast number methods based on two Hypotheses, ranging from a sophisticated seven-equation method to a simple single grid method. These methods were evaluated using implicitly filtered LES of periodic channel flows at friction Reynolds number of 395 on eight systematically refined grids. The seven-equation method shows that the coupling error based on Hypothesis I is much smaller as compared to the numerical and modeling errors and therefore can be neglected. The five-equation method based on Hypothesis II is recommended, which shows a monotonic convergence behavior of the predicted numerical benchmark (SC), and provides realistic error estimates without the need of fixing the orders of accuracy for either numerical or modeling errors. Based on the results from seven-equation and five-equation methods, less expensive three and four-equation methods for practical LES applications were derived. It was found that the new three-equation method is robust as it can be applied to any convergence types and reasonably predicts the error trends. It was also observed that the numerical and modeling errors usually have opposite signs in LES, which suggests error cancellation play an essential role in LES. When RANS verification method is applied, it shows significant error in the prediction of SC on coarse meshes. However, it predicts reasonable SC when the grids resolve at least 80% of the total turbulent kinetic energy.

Biography

Dr. Tao Xing earned his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University in 2002. He worked as a Postdoctoral    Fellow and Assistant Research Scientist at the Iowa Institute of Hydraulics Research from 2002 to 2008. He was an Assistant Professor from 2009 to 2016. Dr. Xing is currently an Associate Professor at University of Idaho. His research interests focus on both fundamental and applied CFD in multi-disciplines. Fundamental CFD research includes estimation of errors and uncertainties using quantitate solution verification and validation (V&V) method for turbulent flow simulations and entropy generation for bypass transitional boundary layers. For V&V, the “factor of safety method” he developed was evaluated as the most accurate and concise uncertainty estimates for monotonically converged numerical solutions.  He was invited to give 12 lectures including the keynote lecture on verification and validation in the 13th National Congress on Hydrodynamics in China in 2014. In 2015, he developed a general framework for V&V for large eddy simulations and very recently        five-equation and robust three-equation methods for LES V&V. Applied CFD research covers a broad range of disciplines including onshore and offshore wind turbine designs, vehicle aerodynamics, fluid-structure interaction for pulmonary ventilation, ship hydrodynamics, and desalination. Dr. Xing’s teaching interests focus on integration of simulation technology into engineering courses and laboratories, development of effective formative and summative evaluation   methods, and development of innovative teaching modules toward achieving ABET learning outcomes. His Google Scholar h-index and i10-index are 19 and 29, respectively. As a PI or Co-PI, he secured more than 1.8 million dollars funding since he joined the University of Idaho in 2011. He won the “Alumni Award” from the University of Idaho in 2013 and again in 2014. He won the “Outstanding Young Faculty Award” from College of Engineering in 2015. He is a licensed U.S. Professional  Engineer.

 

 

 

Westrock Information Session and Interviews

Westrock is recruiting for Summer, 2018 internships in maintenance, operations and process control engineering departments. For mechanical, electrical and chemical engineering students from the sophomore class and above, an information session will be an opportunity to learn more about the company. Interviews will be held the following day for select candidates.

To apply, email a copy of your resume and cover letter to Jim Barnett jbarnett@westrock.com by Monday, January 22nd 2018. Reference Summer 2018 internship and your major in the subject line, or bring your cover letter and resume to the information session.

Internship Panel Discussion and ENGR 489 Internship Poster Session

Learn from employers -- Clearwater Paper and US Army Corps of Engineers -- and former interns from all engineering majors about finding and landing an internship. This is the time to ask your classmates about their internship experience and ask employers what they look for in an intern. Ask the panel about the internship experience, how the interns found their job, would they work there again, and other questions you have related to the internship experience. Join us Thursday, Nov. 30, 4-5 p.m., Sloan 169, for a panel discussion, and then from 5-6 p.m., check out the ENGR 489 internship posters in the first floor Sloan Hallways to learn more about various internship opportunities. » More ...

MME Seminar Series Welcomes Dr. David L Boourell, University of Texas

Held in ETRL 101

Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 am

Dr. David L. Bourell

Temple Foundation Professor of Mechanical Engineering Director, Laboratory for Freeform Fabrication, University of Texas, Austin

 

Metals for Additive Manufacturing

 

Abstract

Additive Manufacturing (AM) has exploded into the public arena over the last seven years, although the first direct metal part was made using a modern AM fabricator over 25 years ago.  This presentation covers the development of metal additive manufacturing and provides a snapshot of the current state of the art in terms of process development and part service properties.  Current research will be presented on the use of elemental powder feedstock in AM to create crack-free metallic parts in otherwise difficult-to-process metal alloys.

Biography

Dr. David L. Bourell is the Temple Foundation Professor of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a leading expert in materials for Additive Manufacturing (AM), having worked in this area since 1988. Dave was the lead author on the original materials patent for Laser Sintering technology (1990); this patent has been cited by over 200 other patents.  He holds 9 primary patents and has published 250 papers. He is a founding member of the ASTM F42 Technical Committee on Additive Manufacturing and currently serves on the ten-member ASTM/ISO Joint Group 51 on Terminology for AM.  Dr. Bourell is a Fellow of ASM International and TMS, and he is also a lifetime member of TMS. In 2009, he received the TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division Distinguished Scientist/Engineer Award. In 2017, he received the Society of Manufacturing Engineers Albert M. Sargent Progress Award for “significant accomplishments in the field of manufacturing processes”.

MME SEMINAR SERIES is excited to present two guest speakers this Thursday: Dr. Larry Ilcewicz, Federal Aviation Administration & Dr. Paul McConnaughey, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

 Refreshments served in ETRL 119 at 10:30 to 11:00 am

 

Dr. Larry Ilcewicz

Federal Aviation Administration, Chief Scientific and Technical Advisor for Composite Materials

Scaling Crucial to Integrated Product Development of Composite Airframe Structure

Special Time– 9:30 to 10:30  in ETRL 101

Abstract

Applications of advanced composite materials in aircraft products have spanned several decades.  These products include small airplanes, propellers,  rotorcraft, military jets, and transport aircraft.  Historical perspectives on  composites used in airframe structure will be summarized, including thoughts on product development, certification, production, and service difficulties.  This will include a review of critical design, manufacturing, maintenance, and cost issues for composite aircraft structures.  It will also summarize the service history, including thoughts relating to the American Airlines Flight Number 587 Accident in 2001.  An  introduction to the damage tolerance of composite aircraft structure will be  given some emphasis.  The technical challenges and barriers to expanding, new   applications will also be discussed as related to career opportunities and integrated product teams in the industry.

Biography

Dr. Larry Ilcewicz is the FAA Chief Scientific and Technical Advisor for Composite Materials.  He started work with the FAA in 1998 and has supported many small airplane, rotorcraft and transport aircraft certification programs.  He has also worked on accident investigations and service problems involving composites.  These experiences helped Larry develop an international plan for composite safety and certification initiatives to work with industry, academia and other government groups in pursuit of guidance, training and standardization.  These efforts formed the basis for a FAA Aviation Safety Composite Plan, which outlines efforts until 2021.

Larry came to the FAA from Boeing, where he worked 17 years on various programs in the commercial transport aircraft division.  This included support to 737, 757, 767 and 777 aircraft in various stages of development, production and service.  Larry was also principal investigator for a large NASA-funded research program to develop  composite design and manufacturing concepts for a wide-body transport fuselage in the 1990s.  He has authored/co-authored more than 80 technical publications.  He has been co-chairman for Composite Materials Handbook 17, CMH-17, since joining the FAA.  In 2013, he was the only member of the United States Department of Transportation to win the Presidential Rank Award.

BEING FOLLOWED BY:

Dr. Paul McConnaughey

Associate Director, Technical, In the Office of the Center Director at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama

The Future of Deep Space Human Exploration

11:00 – 12:00 noon in ETRL 101

 

Abstract

Why explore deep space? And what technologies will it take to get there? Dr. Paul McConnaughey, associate director, technical, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center will discuss the importance of engineering advanced technologies to  journey to deep space – to cislunar, the Moon, Mars and beyond. From the  evolvable heavy-lift capability of the Space Launch System to cutting edge lander propulsion technology, the journey to deep space will require innovation and the next generation STEM workforce to be successful.

Biography

Dr. Paul K. McConnaughey is the associate director, technical, in the Office of the Center Director at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Named to the position in August 2015, McConnaughey is responsible for ensuring the performance of Marshall’s programs and technical activities, with respect to cost, schedule and mission success.

Originally from the Midwest, he earned his bachelor’s degree from Oregon State University in Corvallis, and his master’s degree and doctorate from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He joined Marshall in 1986 as an engineer in the Systems Dynamics Laboratory. McConnaughey has held various leadership positions of  increasing responsibility, including being selected as Marshall’s chief engineer in 2007 and serving as the director of System Engineering and Integration and the chief engineer of the Exploration Systems Development Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

McConnaughey has three daughters and resides in Huntsville, with his wife Angie and their two dogs.